Achievements in International Development Award ’09

Know somebody who’s made a real difference to the fight against global poverry? Why not nominate them for the DFID/Marie Stopes/Guardian ‘Achievements in International Development Award’. Closing date Friday 24th July – http://bit.ly/BHZp2

Source: bit.ly
The Guardian is delighted to be launching the Achievements in International Development Award. Running concurrently with the Guardian International Development Journalism Competition, the award aims to…
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About the NNNGO Millenium Campaign’s Video Series (II)

And here are the final four videos released by the UN Millenium Campaign in its eight day one short movie per day campaign.

Goal – 5: Maternal Health Continue reading

7 Point Agenda: CSOs advice President Umaru Musa Yar’adua.

With a terrific turnout of 100 individual votes from across the country, civil society organizations (CSOs) in Nigeria have now made their choice: “Infrastructure particularly Electricity and Transportation” has been polled as the top agenda the Federal Government of Nigeria should focus on in the implementation of its 7 point agenda.

Capturing 95% of the total polls, President Umaru Musa Yar’adua is now being advised to prioritize his seven point agenda with Infrastructure particularly Electricity and Transportation as the top priority. Human Capital – investments in health, education and training and Niger Delta regional development had very strong showings too with 57% and 34% respectively.

“As the Umaru Musa Yar’adua administration concludes its 2nd year and looks forward to the next two years, it is particularly important that it prioritizes its development agenda for Nigeria as encapsulated in the 7 point agenda” Continue reading

Brown proposes £60bn climate fund

Gordon Brown, British PM (Picture: BBC News)

Gordon Brown, British PM (Picture: BBC News)

Prime Minister Gordon Brown wants to set up a £60bn annual fund to help poor countries deal with climate change.

He hopes it will break the deadlock over who will pay developing nations to adapt to the changing climate and who will help them obtain clean technology. Countries must reach a binding global agreement on carbon emission cuts at December’s Copenhagen summit, he said. The summit is seen as the last chance to negotiate a successor to the Kyoto agreement, which expires in 2012.

Environment and anti-poverty campaigners welcomed Mr Brown’s remarks but said he and other leaders must deliver real financial support not merely “empty rhetoric”. Finance is one of the key sticking points in global negotiations, with poor nations demanding huge amounts of cash and rich nations reluctant to commit. The UK figure is less than developing nations say they need – but at least it will provide a negotiating point in the coming G8 when the leaders of emerging nations will join for a special climate summit chaired by US President Barack Obama.

Some of the political blocks need to be cleared in this meeting if there is to be a new global deal at the UN climate talks in Copenhagen in December.
Mr Brown said: “Copenhagen is twenty-three weeks away. When historians look back on this critical moment, let them say, not that we were the generation that failed our children; but that we had the courage, and the will, to succeed.”

‘Act with vision’

Speaking in London, Mr Brown said leading industrialised economies must support developing nations most at risk from climate change to enable them to keep on growing while meeting their environmental obligations. He suggested £60bn would be needed to help poor countries adjust to climate change, stressing the UK would pay “its fair share” towards this.

Read rest of the story at the BBC News Website.

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Millenium Campaign’s Video Series (I)

A few days ago, Millenium Campaign announced it will be releasing a video a day for eight days to call attention to the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) and the importance for their attainments. Given our committment to the MDG we have decided to feature the videos here on our blog in furtherance to our support of the Millenium Campaign’s work thus:

Goal – 1: End Hunger

Goal – 2: Universal Education

Goal – 3 Gender Equity

Goal – 4: Child Health

You may follow discussions on theMDGs and this videos by visiting  UN Millenium Campaign facebook page: http://tinyurl.com/mlc5wz.

Thank you.

: Gender
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Earlier posts III-Financial Industry Receives 10 Times More Money in 1 year than Poor Countries Receive in 49 Years

Ahead of UN General Assembly’s high-level summit on the economic crisis on June 24-26, UN Millennium Campaign says new analysis indicates that finding money for aid is a matter of political will – not lack of resources – and calls on donors to finally meet their aid commitments

June 23, 2009 – The United Nations Millennium Campaign today released an analysis showing that since the inception of aid (overseas development assistance) almost 50 years ago, donor countries have given some $2 trillion in aid. And yet over the past year, $18 trillion has been found globally to bail out banks and other financial institutions. The amount of total aid over the past 49 years represents just eleven percent of the money found for financial institutions in one year. The UN Millennium Campaign is urgently calling on rich countries gathering at this week’s high-level summit on the economic crisis to make no further excuses that they lack resources and to urgently deliver on their aid commitments.
“The stark contrast between the money dispersed to the world’s desperately poor after 49 years of painstaking summits and negotiations and the staggering sums found virtually overnight to bail out the creators of the global economic crisis makes it impossible for governments to any longer claim that the world can’t find the money to help the 50,000 people who are dying of extreme poverty every day,” said Salil Shetty, Director of the United Nations Millennium Campaign. “This is a straightforward question of political will. Rich countries’ priorities will become crystal clear at this week’s summit on the economic crisis, where we hope they will finally deliver on the aid they have repeatedly pledged but not delivered to those who need it most.”
Worse still, the global economic crisis is expected to further impact the delivery of aid to poor countries at a time when the need is greatest. Already, the consequences of the crisis, caused by the richest people in the richest countries, are being disproportionately borne by poor countries. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, the economic crisis has resulted in 100 million more people going hungry, taking the total number of hungry people in the world to a staggering one billion. At the same time, only $9.4 billion of the $28.3 billion — less than a third — pledged at the Gleneagles Summit in 2005 to be delivered to Sub-Saharan Africa by 2010, has actually been delivered.
The Millennium Campaign believes any discussions of a new financial architecture must be inclusive of the voices and needs of the poor. The Campaign is therefore calling on donor countries to immediately and unconditionally do the following:
• Urgently agree to a timetable to accelerate delivery of their aid commitments.
• Make rapid progress toward achieving the Paris Declaration and Accra Agenda to simplify and streamline aid, including a clear timetable for implementation of existing commitments.
• Reduce and/or eliminate all trade-distorting agricultural subsidies.
• Ensure that poor countries are fully represented in all decision making bodies and in the restructuring of the global financial infrastructure.
The Millennium Campaign is calling on poor countries to immediately do the following:
• Ensure that national development policies and plans are pro-poor and focused on women and excluded groups.
• Prioritize expenditures on the Millennium Development Goals.
• Ensure accountability and transparency in the management of public money.
• Prioritize domestic resource mobilization.
Go to http://www.youtube.com/mcampaign to watch the videoclip.
——-
Ahead of UN General Assembly’s high-level summit on the economic crisis on June 24-26, UN Millennium Campaign says new analysis indicates that finding money for aid is a matter of political will – not lack of resources – and calls on donors to finally meet their aid commitments

June 23, 2009 – The United Nations Millennium Campaign today released an analysis showing that since the inception of aid (overseas development assistance) almost 50 years ago, donor countries have given some $2 trillion in aid. And yet over the past year, $18 trillion has been found globally to bail out banks and other financial institutions. The amount of total aid over the past 49 years represents just eleven percent of the money found for financial institutions in one year. The UN Millennium Campaign is urgently calling on rich countries gathering at this week’s high-level summit on the economic crisis to make no further excuses that they lack resources and to urgently deliver on their aid commitments.
“The stark contrast between the money dispersed to the world’s desperately poor after 49 years of painstaking summits and negotiations and the staggering sums found virtually overnight to bail out the creators of the global economic crisis makes it impossible for governments to any longer claim that the world can’t find the money to help the 50,000 people who are dying of extreme poverty every day,” said Salil Shetty, Director of the United Nations Millennium Campaign. “This is a straightforward question of political will. Rich countries’ priorities will become crystal clear at this week’s summit on the economic crisis, where we hope they will finally deliver on the aid they have repeatedly pledged but not delivered to those who need it most.”
Worse still, the global economic crisis is expected to further impact the delivery of aid to poor countries at a time when the need is greatest. Already, the consequences of the crisis, caused by the richest people in the richest countries, are being disproportionately borne by poor countries. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, the economic crisis has resulted in 100 million more people going hungry, taking the total number of hungry people in the world to a staggering one billion. At the same time, only $9.4 billion of the $28.3 billion — less than a third — pledged at the Gleneagles Summit in 2005 to be delivered to Sub-Saharan Africa by 2010, has actually been delivered.
The Millennium Campaign believes any discussions of a new financial architecture must be inclusive of the voices and needs of the poor. The Campaign is therefore calling on donor countries to immediately and unconditionally do the following:
• Urgently agree to a timetable to accelerate delivery of their aid commitments.
• Make rapid progress toward achieving the Paris Declaration and Accra Agenda to simplify and streamline aid, including a clear timetable for implementation of existing commitments.
• Reduce and/or eliminate all trade-distorting agricultural subsidies.
• Ensure that poor countries are fully represented in all decision making bodies and in the restructuring of the global financial infrastructure.
The Millennium Campaign is calling on poor countries to immediately do the following:
• Ensure that national development policies and plans are pro-poor and focused on women and excluded groups.
• Prioritize expenditures on the Millennium Development Goals.
• Ensure accountability and transparency in the management of public money.
• Prioritize domestic resource mobilization.
Go to http://www.youtube.com/mcampaign to watch the videoclip.
——-

Note to editors:
The UN Millennium Campaign was established by the UN Secretary General in 2002. The Campaign supports citizens’ efforts to hold their governments to account for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. The Millennium Development Goals were adopted by 189 world leaders from the north and south, as part of the Millennium Declaration which was signed in 2000. These leaders agreed to eradicate extreme poverty and its root causes by 2015. Our premise is simple: we are the first generation that can end poverty and we refuse to miss this opportunity. For more information, visit http://www.endpoverty2015.org.
Click here to unsubscribe / Copyright 2004 – 2007 UN Millennium Campaign

Note to editors:
The UN Millennium Campaign was established by the UN Secretary General in 2002. The Campaign supports citizens’ efforts to hold their governments to account for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. The Millennium Development Goals were adopted by 189 world leaders from the north and south, as part of the Millennium Declaration which was signed in 2000. These leaders agreed to eradicate extreme poverty and its root causes by 2015. Our premise is simple: we are the first generation that can end poverty and we refuse to miss this opportunity. For more information, visit http://www.endpoverty2015.org.
Click here to unsubscribe / Copyright 2004 – 2007 UN Millennium Campaign.

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Earlier Posts II-Assessing the Impact of ICTs on the Attainment of MDGs in Nigeria

Originally posted here: http://bit.ly/fVNE2

All day tomorrow (from 8am until midnight), I will be discussing the topic, “Assessing the Impact of ICTs on the Attainment of MDGs in Nigeria”. Thanks to the technology platform provided by FaceBook, NaijaPulse, Twitter, my personal website and my blog, I will engage participants of what has been described by the organizers as a “Wall to Wall” conference in a push-and-pull conversation that can be followed real-time by anyone that has access to the internet. Unlike a regular conference where only few people get to ask questions after the resource person has made his/her presentation, this “Wall to Wall” conference presents the opportunity for a day-long process that gives as much room to discussion as it does questions and answers. When Oyebisi Oluseyi mentioned the idea some weeks back, I was quick to say yes because I could see the potential impact of such a new way to engage. Let’s face it, Facebook walls are probably become the most visited public places these days. We check for new gist about friends, leave a line or two for those we wish to get their attention, and also check up on our not-so-liked friends with the hope that you would read something that could give you the liberty to laugh at them. Using this public eSquare for the purpose of this discussion thus shows how far we have gone in social interaction. And that in itself is a demonstartion of how technology can impact the way we live. I am writing this ahead of the discussions to provide links to some background materials that can help during the discussion. For some background reading on the MDGs, please visit the United Nations website; and for ICTs in Nigeria, feel free to download an earlier report of mine (that discusses the status of ICTs in Nigeria) at http://www.pinigeria.org/download/ngictupdate2007.pdf. At 8am (0700 GMT) tomorrow, I will leave a short message on my FaceBook wall to kick-start the discussions. To broaden the scope of the discussions, I’ll be using my networked platforms (FaceBook, NaijaPulse, Twitter, my personal website and my blog) since entries on my NaijaPulse page are automatically reflected on my Twitter page, which then sends the same to my FaceBook status, blog (see right column) and personal website (see left column). I will check my wall from time to time, to ensure that the various discussion threads are neatly tied up. I will also use the hash-tag, #minigeria (’m’ from MDGs and ‘i’ from ICTs), to allow anyone follow the discussions through Roomatic. I will also monitor this blog, which has now been open for comments. I trust that between the various platforms, we’ll have an interesting conversation that will inform all participants and point us towards action-laden steps that can truly move us closer to the attainment of the MDGs in Nigeria by taking advantage of the many opportunities that ICTs provide. However, I think it’s safe to warn anyone with whom I have physical meetings tomorrow that I’ll be reserving only 50% of my attention for such moments, the other 50% will have to keep track of the online discussions (my much more comfortable zone). Let’s talk from 8am tomorrow…

Please follow ‘Gbenga Sesan live on our faceboo page: http://bit.ly/6fbsJ or on our twitter page: http://www.twitter.com/nnngo.

Your comments and thoughts are welcome!

Thank you.

Oluwakorede Asuni

For: NNNGO New Media Team